Inside the University 651 - Finishing the Triangle when Opponent Hides His Arm

Inside the University 651 - Finishing the Triangle when Opponent Hides His Arm

Add to Favorites Remove From Favorites 393 21 days ago

This time after Rene bites and gets the diamond position, his opponent hides his arm on the outside of the leg. Rene gets his safety lock and readjusts his position the same as before. He reaches across to grab the arm and his other hand grabs the wrist to attack a kimura. His opponent will usually defend by straightening his arm, and this gives Rene the opportunity to drag the arm across and finish the triangle.


Inside the University 650 - Avoid Getting Stacked in the Triangle

Inside the University 650 - Avoid Getting Stacked in the Triangle

Add to Favorites 459 Remove From Favorites 22 days ago

After locking the triangle, sometimes your opponent will try to stack you to break free. In this case, you can push your own knee that is over the shoulder, and keep your arm stiff. Now any forward momentum your opponent gains should also push your body and help prevent him from stacking you.

Inside the University 649 - Key Details to Finish the Triangle

Inside the University 649 - Key Details to Finish the Triangle

Add to Favorites 475 Remove From Favorites 22 days ago

Touching on some key details to finish the triangle after he has adjusted his hips and locked his legs, Rene first makes sure his feet are flexed so the the back of his legs are tight. Next he flexes his legs to bring his ankles down, and then squeezes his knees together. This should make his triangle tight enough that he doesn't need to pull the head down to finish, but that is also an option.

Inside the University 648 - Setting Up the Triangle with the Diamond Position

Inside the University 648 - Setting Up the Triangle with the Diamond Position

Add to Favorites 492 Remove From Favorites 24 days ago

Starting from his closed guard, Rene controls his opponent's arm on his torso, raises his hips and "bites" his legs to the diamond position. The diamond position is his first step to the triangle, where his top thigh is connected to the neck and his feet are crossed behind the head. Next he reaches across to control the inside arm and drag it across his body. He uses his legs to pull his opponent down and his other hand grabs his shin to create his safety lock. Now he can place his foot on the hip to adjust his angle and lock his triangle.

Eduardo Jamelão Conceição Series 10 - Guillotine from Takedown Defense

Eduardo Jamelão Conceição Series 10 - Guillotine from Takedown Defense

Add to Favorites 484 Remove From Favorites 80 days ago

From standing up, Eduardo has his arm resting on his leg to protect from takedowns. As his opponent shoots in for the single leg, he cups the chin, pushes the head to the outside and sets up his guillotine lock. From here he has the options to finish while standing up, or fall back to a closed or half guard to finish.

Inside the University 588 - Avoid Staying on Your Back

Inside the University 588 - Avoid Staying on Your Back

Add to Favorites 756 Remove From Favorites 122 days ago

A major detail when looking to choke from the closed guard is to avoid staying on your back. Whether your opponent lays on top of you or tries to keep his posture, it is key to escape your hips out to the side when going for the submission. Also, bring your elbow to you when choking rather than opening them out wide.

Inside the University 587 - Cross Collar Choke from Closed Guard

Inside the University 587 - Cross Collar Choke from Closed Guard

Add to Favorites 667 Remove From Favorites 123 days ago

As soon as Saulo establishes his closed guard, he opens his opponent's collar and reaches for a deep cross collar grip. Next he grips the sleeve and keeps it on his chest, not allowing his opponent to put his hand on the ground. Now he wiggles his hips to create space and places his foot on the hips while his other knee frames against the body. From here he kicks his frame leg straight, folds it across the back to break his opponent's posture while he escapes out to the side, and now he can easily place his second grip on the gi and finish the choke by pulling to him.

Inside the University 547 - Creating Opportunites

Inside the University 547 - Creating Opportunites

Add to Favorites 644 Remove From Favorites 189 days ago

Saulo explains that the cross collar choke is not easy to finish on an opponent equal to your level, but it is very effective to set up many other positions and create opportunities. When you go for the choke, your opponent must react, and depending on how he reacts, many possibilities will open up for you. The key is to keep attacking.

Inside the University 546 - Timing Your Grips

Inside the University 546 - Timing Your Grips

Add to Favorites 659 Remove From Favorites 190 days ago

Saulo points out the importance of properly timing when you make your second grip, and taking it with speed and force. As his opponent comes back the other way, Saulo turns, throwing his shoulder off the mat like a punch to grab the collar. If he goes without speed or force, it will easily be defended.

Inside the University 545 - Creating the Reaction to Set Up the Cross Collar Choke

Inside the University 545 - Creating the Reaction to Set Up the Cross Collar Choke

Add to Favorites 766 Remove From Favorites 191 days ago

Saulo's typical setup for the cross collar choke begins with his cross collar grip, followed by a 45 degree hip escape as he pushes the collar away. Now his opponent reacts by coming back to him, just as Saulo wanted, so he immediately sets his second grip underneath his first. From here he pulls his opponent in, switches his hips to face the other side and flexes his wrists to finish the choke.

Inside the University 544 - Staying on Your Side

Inside the University 544 - Staying on Your Side

Add to Favorites 736 Remove From Favorites 192 days ago

One of the main points of focus while in the closed guard is to not be flattened out. This is why Saulo is always looking to get on his side and stay there. His collar grip arm will help him by keeping his opponent at a distance, but it's his shoulder that is doing the work. Also, it's important that his top leg is pinching down and keeping pressure on his opponent.

Inside the University 543 - Getting to Side Closed Guard

Inside the University 543 - Getting to Side Closed Guard

Add to Favorites 814 Remove From Favorites 193 days ago

After watching students practice, Saulo points out the difference between escaping your hips and moving to the side. When punching the collar grip, he swivels his hips so he gets to his opponent's side, staying connected. He is not escaping his hips and creating space.