Inside the University 963 - Switching Your Foot on the Hip with 2-on-1 Sleeve Grip

Inside the University 963 - Switching Your Foot on the Hip with 2-on-1 Sleeve Grip

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As Gustavo is playing the 2-on-1 sleeve grip, his opponent is moving to the side in effort to pass his guard. When his opponent gets far enough that Gustavo is concerned his guard will be passed, he puts his free foot on the hip and drops his other foot down, and continues to play guard.


Inside the University 962 - Guard Retention with 2-on-1 Sleeve Grip

Inside the University 962 - Guard Retention with 2-on-1 Sleeve Grip

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To start this lesson about 2-on-1 sleeve grip, Gustavo first shows how to do some basic guard retention while playing guard with this grip. He keeps his foot in the hip on the same side of the arm he controls. His other foot is free to push the biceps, use as a De La Riva hook or many other options. As his opponent tries to move to the side, Gustavo makes sure to follow with him.

Inside the University 961 - Deep Half Guard Sweep when Opponent Grabs Your Pants

Inside the University 961 - Deep Half Guard Sweep when Opponent Grabs Your Pants

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This time when Gustavo sets up his deep half guard, his opponent grabs his pants at the knee to control his leg and fend off the hook. Instead off feeding the lapel to his hand, he opens the gi and reaches in for a nice collar grip. Now he sits up, and sweeps his opponent very similar to a fireman's carry.

Inside the University 960 - Hunting for the Choke

Inside the University 960 - Hunting for the Choke

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Gustavo goes over a few details on how to use your feet to help you move your hips where they need to be. He also shows how he immediately looks for the choke when attacking his opponent's back. Getting the hooks in is secondary for him, so always hunt for the choke.

Inside the University 959 - Why You Shouldn't Stay Flat on Your Back in Deep Half Guard

Inside the University 959 - Why You Shouldn't Stay Flat on Your Back in Deep Half Guard

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Gustavo breaks down why you shouldn't stay flat on your back while playing deep half guard. If you are flat, it's much easier for your opponent to step over your head and work on passing your guard. The only time you should be flat on your back is during a transitional movement.

Inside the University 958 - Back Take from Deep Half Guard

Inside the University 958 - Back Take from Deep Half Guard

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Showing a second option after he sets up his deep half guard, Gustavo shows how he likes to take the back. Once he has his lapel grip and is ready to sweep, he hooks his opponent's leg with his foot and elevates it. He kicks his opponent forward and slides his head out the back. Now depending on his opponent's reaction, he looks to control the back, or maintain top position.

Inside the University 957 - Deep Half Guard Sweep with Lapel Grip

Inside the University 957 - Deep Half Guard Sweep with Lapel Grip

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To start this lesson Professor Gustavo goes over some basic rules for the deep half guard, including making sure you face the same way as your opponent, and not stay flat on your back. He feeds his opponent's lapel behind the leg and swims his front arm to the back to make the grip. To sweep he can either bridge or lift the leg and turn into his opponent.

Xande's Esgrima Series 7 - High Esgrima Against Frame

Xande's Esgrima Series 7 - High Esgrima Against Frame

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Xande is passing with the esgrima, but his opponent is doing a good job using his frame to keep Xande at bay. This is when Xande drives his weight forward to get a high esgrima and neutralize his opponent's frame. Now he has much more leverage to pass the guard.

Xande's Esgrima Series 6 - Esgrima from Headquarters

Xande's Esgrima Series 6 - Esgrima from Headquarters

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In this case Xande has gotten to his headquarters position with one of his opponent's legs between his. He cups the inside knee and pushes on the outside knee while putting pressure down with his chest to cause a push back from his opponent. This is the reaction he wants to slide his arm in for the esgrima and break his hips to start his pass.

Xande's Esgrima Series 5 - Esgrima Against Butterfly Pummeling Attempt

Xande's Esgrima Series 5 - Esgrima Against Butterfly Pummeling Attempt

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Now Xande's opponent is in the sit up butterfly and is forcing a pummeling battle for the underhook. While pummels with him until he feels he can stuff one shoulder and get the esgrima on the other side. His arm wraps behind the back and his head goes tight to the body. Now he can drop his weight, break the hip and work on his pass.

Xande's Esgrima Series 4 - Esgrima Against the Sit Up Butterfly Guard

Xande's Esgrima Series 4 - Esgrima Against the Sit Up Butterfly Guard

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Now Xande's opponent is working from a traditional sit up butterfly guard with the underhook. Xande pushes on the bottom knee, rounds his back to create a strong base, and scoots back to create some space. From here he walks his leg in between his opponent's leg and switches the hand on the knee to an esgrima underhook, and forces his way to the half guard. Now he can drive his knee up and work to knee cut pass.

Xande's Esgrima Series 3 - Passing when Opponent Closes the Half Guard

Xande's Esgrima Series 3 - Passing when Opponent Closes the Half Guard

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This time when Xande looks to break his hip to smash the butterfly guard, his opponent is able to trap his leg and lock up the half guard. The first thing Xande must do is move his body forward, because if he is too low, his opponent will recover. He pushes his opponent's head with the back of his own head, and gets on his toes to lift his butt in the air to a tripod position. Now he can bring his knee forward and begin to knee cut pass.