Inside the University 844 - Shin to Hip Connection in Classic Guard

Inside the University 844 - Shin to Hip Connection in Classic Guard

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Xande breaks down some core concepts of the classic guard, and explains how getting in position to scissors sweep is his go to first action. From here he can look for other attacks and come back to the scissors if they don't succeed. He also stresses the importance of your shin bone staying connected to your opponent's hip bone while playing classic guard.


Inside the University 843 - Principles of the Classic Guard

Inside the University 843 - Principles of the Classic Guard

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Now Xande goes into detail on his classic guard, using collar and sleeve grips with both feet on the hips. He goes over the common scenario of his opponent stepping over one leg to pass, and how he can replace the guard, and also set up some attacks while doing so.

Inside the University 831 - Setting Up Foot on the Hip Guard

Inside the University 831 - Setting Up Foot on the Hip Guard

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Professor Rene begins class by showing how he likes to set up the foot on the hip guard from the closed guard. As his opponent is standing up in his guard, Rene turns his hips and slides his shin across the waist to create frame. He places his foot on the hip and uses it to square up to his opponent, where he can place his other foot on the hip as well. Here he uses his collar and sleeve grips to pull, and uses his feet to push, making his opponent uncomfortable.

Inside the University 826 - Collar Guard Concepts

Inside the University 826 - Collar Guard Concepts

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To start the lesson, Professor Gustavo shows some basic concepts of the seated guard, and more importantly the collar guard. First is a drill to recover and transition, using your feet in the hips and biceps. This guard is often played with a sleeve grip also, but for this lesson he is more focused on using his free hand to base himself and move laterally.

Inside the University 824 - Recovering Guard when Opponent has One Arm Under the Leg

Inside the University 824 - Recovering Guard when Opponent has One Arm Under the Leg

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This time when Professor Rene's opponent is trying to pass with one arm under his leg, he simply pushes the elbow, posts on his forearm and escapes his hips, creating space to recover his guard. Sometimes he will also be able to roll himself to reverse his opponent and get on top.

Inside the University 801 - Defending Right Away

Inside the University 801 - Defending Right Away

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Now Saulo discusses the importance of defending right away, as oppose to taking your time and allowing your opponent to impose his offense. As soon as his opponent starts to open his guard, he immediately shrimps and begins his counter attack.

Inside the University 800 - Preventing the Guard Pass

Inside the University 800 - Preventing the Guard Pass

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Now on bottom, Saulo shows how to react when your opponent opens your closed guard. When his opponent pushes on his knee, Saulo immediately reaches and makes a cross grip on the sleeve, his other hand grips the triceps and his foot goes on the hip. Now he opens his other leg and places it on the shoulder, where he now has some different options to attack.

Inside the University 737 - Moving Your Hips Back and Forth

Inside the University 737 - Moving Your Hips Back and Forth

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Saulo breaks down the fundamental movement of the hips while recovering guard. After his bridge, while still on his side, he is using a back and forth motion to gain momentum, whether he goes to recover guard or turn belly down. If he recovers, his inside leg now becomes a frame against his opponent's body, and a new point of leverage to use.

Inside the University 736 - Recovering Guard

Inside the University 736 - Recovering Guard

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Saulo's opponent is passing his guard, so as soon as he gets around the legs, Saulo's first move is to turn on his side at his 45 degree angle, with both elbows attached to his body. His opponent drops his weight to put pressure, so Saulo bridges to create space. If he now has room to move his hips, he brings his legs in to recover guard.

Inside the University 621 - Resetting the Pedal

Inside the University 621 - Resetting the Pedal

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Now Xande emphasizes the importance of resetting the pedal in this series of movements and techniques. When using his diamond defense and knee shield, his number one goal is to get his foot on the hip and control the distance between him and his opponent.

Inside the University 620 - Pivoting from Control Points and Setting Up Spider Guard

Inside the University 620 - Pivoting from Control Points and Setting Up Spider Guard

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Xande has his knee shield guard with his spur in place, and his opponent is trying to hug and control his head. His immediate reaction is to frame against the arm using the diamond defense. Next he removes his spur to place his pedal, and slides his knee shield up to the chest so his foot is on the other hip. Now he squares his hips to his opponent and grabs both sleeves with both feet on the hips, where he can begin to play spider guard.

Inside the University 618 - Using Your Pedal and Spur to Retain Guard

Inside the University 618 - Using Your Pedal and Spur to Retain Guard

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While retaining his open guard, two of Xande's greatest assets are his pedal (foot on the hip) and spur (heel behind the thigh). In this drill, when he opens his guard, his opponent steps over his leg to begin passing. This is when Xande places his spur behind the inside leg and keeps control of it, while also keeping his collar gripping arm straight to maintain distance. When he has the chance, he extends his body, creating space for him to remove his spur and place his foot on the outside hip to make his pedal. Now he can push off the hip to square himself and recover guard.