Inside the University 501 - Sweeping the Floor with Your Feet

Inside the University 501 - Sweeping the Floor with Your Feet

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One detail Xande points out here is that it is not good to stomp your feet on the mat to gain leverage for your bumps when you want to escape. Instead, he is just sweeping the mat as he takes small steps away from his opponent. This allows him to stay connected to the mat, ready to react whenever necessary, and also does not telegraph his next move to his opponent. Now he works his side control escape drill with this in mind, and focuses on keeping a connection with the mat.


Inside the University 500 - Setting Up the Hip Bump

Inside the University 500 - Setting Up the Hip Bump

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Touching on a common mistake, Xande points out how he does not like to make a big hip bump right away. Instead, he moves a little to makes some space, makes sure his frames are in place and then makes his big hip bump and extends his body. Sometimes he even waits for a reaction from his opponent to time his bump. Also, he makes sure to keep his frames in place until he has recovered his guard.

Inside the University 499 - Pushing Off the Shoulder

Inside the University 499 - Pushing Off the Shoulder

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Fine tuning some details, Xande explains how he places his top hand at his opponent's clavicle, with the edge of the pinky finger side making the initial contact. His other hand can stay down at the hip to keep a block and feel his opponent's movement. After Xande makes his first hip bump, now he can extend his upper body to straighten his arm, rather than just trying to push the shoulder away. This gives him the space he needs to bring his leg back in and recover his guard.

Inside the University 498 - Replacing Guard from Side Control

Inside the University 498 - Replacing Guard from Side Control

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With his opponent on his side control, Xande places both hands on his opponent's shoulder, his outside foot flat on the mat and his inside foot on its side with his knee attached to the body. He steps his flat foot out a bit and makes his first small hip escape. Now he has a little space to take another step and push off the shoulder for a big hip escape, and he can bring his leg in to begin replacing guard.

Inside the University 470 - Pushing Yourself Out of a Hole

Inside the University 470 - Pushing Yourself Out of a Hole

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Using the idea of pushing himself up out of a hole, Xande explains the importance of pushing at the correct angle when escaping side control or recovering guard. When he pushes off his opponent, his arms directed down from his body, not away in front. This gives him the leverage and space he needs to escape and recover.

Inside the University 469 - Anticipating Side Control

Inside the University 469 - Anticipating Side Control

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Xande emphasizes a very important point that he is not so much playing guard at this point as he is anticipating and defending side control. With that in mind, his continuous focus is on keeping his foot out wide to keep stepping and escaping his hips so he has the space to bring his elbow frame inside. It's also very important that he does not get stuck flat on his back, and he is always working from his side.

Inside the University 468 - Replacing Guard when Opponent Reaches His Arm Across

Inside the University 468 - Replacing Guard when Opponent Reaches His Arm Across

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Xande's opponent does the old school pass, and this time he gets to the side and puts his arm across Xande's body to trap him with his forearm. Xande's reaction is to flare his outside leg out as wide as he can, and do an explosive bridge and hip escape to create as much space as possible. Now he can bring his forearm in to block his opponent's hips and recover his guard. Ideally Xande will react immediately and not give his opponent time to settle in.

Inside the University 434 - Extending Your Body Away from Your Opponent

Inside the University 434 - Extending Your Body Away from Your Opponent

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Correcting the most common mistake of his students, Saulo shows how he extends his body away from his opponent after he has connected his elbow and knee. Once his body is straight, then he can escape the hips and bring his inside leg back in to recover his guard. As always, he emphasize the need to drill over and over, repetition is the only way to learn.

Inside the University 433 - Defending from Your Side

Inside the University 433 - Defending from Your Side

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Answering some questions, Saulo stresses the importance of staying on your side after you bridge, and not letting your opponent flatten you out. Also, once your elbow and knee are connected, you must push off to extend your body, and then you will have the space to recover your guard.

Inside the University 432 - Creating Space to Replace Guard

Inside the University 432 - Creating Space to Replace Guard

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Breaking down a common mistake, Saulo stresses the importance of pushing yourself away from your opponent after bridging. Many students will bridge and immediately try to replace the guard, but they do not have the space to succeed. So it is vital to escape your hips and create the space to bring your legs in and recover guard.

Inside the University 431 - Arm Positioning while Defending Side Control

Inside the University 431 - Arm Positioning while Defending Side Control

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When in bottom side control, Saulo advises against bringing your inside arm down to your opponent's hip, as this can expose your neck for attack. Second, his outside arm cups near the top of the head, where he has more control than if he cupped the neck. After he bridges, he uses his arms to push himself away from his opponent, giving him the space he needs to set up his block.

Inside the University 430 - Blocking Side Control

Inside the University 430 - Blocking Side Control

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After your guard has been passed and your opponent establishes side control, it's very important to stay calm and not give up the fight. Next, do not get your hands trapped against yourself or try to push his hips. Instead, Saulo traps his opponent's head by closing his biceps on it. He keeps his other arm attached to his body and his hand loose and free to move around. Now he bridges and while on his shoulder, he connects his inside elbow and knee together to protect his side. Now he is in a good position to keep blocking the side control, and has set himself up to escape when he is ready.