Inside the University 593 - Staying In Tune with Your Training Partner

Inside the University 593 - Staying In Tune with Your Training Partner

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Going over the techniques, Saulo discusses the importance of working with your partner and staying in tune as you practice, in order to get the most efficiency out of your training. It is important to talk to each other and calibrate your strength and timing when doing the drills, so you can both learn the ins and outs of the position.


Inside the University 592 - Defending a Deep Knee Cut

Inside the University 592 - Defending a Deep Knee Cut

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Saulo shows the last line of defense when your opponent goes for a knee cut and gets it deep before you can defend. He turns in facing his opponent, and keeps his elbows hugged tight to his body keeping himself safe from any grip control. From his side, can sit up and recover his guard.

Inside the University 589 - Modified Butterfly Guard Sweep

Inside the University 589 - Modified Butterfly Guard Sweep

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In this scenario, Saulo sets up his collar sleeve guard and his opponent reacts by leaning forward and putting his weight on Saulo's bottom leg. Now Saulo sits up and drops his knee shield to place his foot under the thigh as a butterfly hook. He drops his foot on the hip to the mat, and rolls to the side on his shoulder, elevating his hook leg and sweeping his opponent.

Inside the University 588 - Avoid Staying on Your Back

Inside the University 588 - Avoid Staying on Your Back

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A major detail when looking to choke from the closed guard is to avoid staying on your back. Whether your opponent lays on top of you or tries to keep his posture, it is key to escape your hips out to the side when going for the submission. Also, bring your elbow to you when choking rather than opening them out wide.

Inside the University 587 - Cross Collar Choke from Closed Guard

Inside the University 587 - Cross Collar Choke from Closed Guard

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As soon as Saulo establishes his closed guard, he opens his opponent's collar and reaches for a deep cross collar grip. Next he grips the sleeve and keeps it on his chest, not allowing his opponent to put his hand on the ground. Now he wiggles his hips to create space and places his foot on the hips while his other knee frames against the body. From here he kicks his frame leg straight, folds it across the back to break his opponent's posture while he escapes out to the side, and now he can easily place his second grip on the gi and finish the choke by pulling to him.

Inside the University 586 - Combinations from the Side Smash

Inside the University 586 - Combinations from the Side Smash

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Now combining all the principles of his side smash series, Xande breaks down some common situations and shows different combinations to smash, pass or take the back depending on how his opponent reacts.

Inside the University 585 - Controlling the Hips when You Take the Back

Inside the University 585 - Controlling the Hips when You Take the Back

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Stressing a key point, Xande shows the importance of controlling your opponent's hips when attempting to take the back. Xande uses his elbow to keep pressure down and make sure the hips stay on the floor, and his opponent cannot roll. If his opponent is able to roll away, Xande waits for the space between the hip and the floor, and then places his inside hook first. Then he can control and look for the second hook.

Inside the University 584 - Taking the Back from the Drag Position

Inside the University 584 - Taking the Back from the Drag Position

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Xande starts off from the drag position he ends up in after passing the guard, and now decides he wants to take the back. He first grips the far lapel and uses his elbow to pressure down the legs. With his other shoulder, he raises his opponent's top elbow and walks around til he can pass his head and get to the back. Now he makes a seatbelt grip, brings his knee up to the bottom shoulder, throws his other leg over the body and sits back to take back control.

Inside the University 579 - Foot Lock Escape

Inside the University 579 - Foot Lock Escape

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Now showing the defense to his foot lock submission, Bernardo's first objective is to close the distance between him and his opponent by grabbing whatever he can and pulling himself in. Then he looks to push the foot off his hip and scoot over his opponent's leg. A point of focus is to react as soon as possible to increase your chance of survival.

Inside the University 567 - Developing Proper Timing

Inside the University 567 - Developing Proper Timing

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Wrapping up the lesson for the day, Saulo speaks on the importance of training with the right goal in mind. In this case, the training partners must be on the same page and cooperate with each other in order to develop the proper timing of the sweep. This lesson can be extended to everyday practice.

Inside the University 566 - Half Guard Sweep Demonstrated in Live Training

Inside the University 566 - Half Guard Sweep Demonstrated in Live Training

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Fabio demonstrates his sweep in a live situation while training partners get the escrima and try to pass his guard.

Inside the University 565 - Getting Top Position After You Bridge

Inside the University 565 - Getting Top Position After You Bridge

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Touching on a few details, Fabio shows that he is not rolling immediately after bridging his opponent off him. He steers the wheel with his grips to roll his opponent, and then he can either bring his outside leg over or his inside leg underneath to get to the top. He also points out the difference of having a low escrima which is ineffective, and a high escrima which can immobilize the arm.