Inside the University 439 - Hugo Marques Takedown Sparring

Inside the University 439 - Hugo Marques Takedown Sparring

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After a tough training in preparation for competition, Hugo Marques stays in the middle while fresh opponents come in every minute to battle for takedowns.


Inside the University 438 - Getting Full Rotation

Inside the University 438 - Getting Full Rotation

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Another detail while Gustavo turns his hips in the air is that he is rotating fully, until he is looking at the mat. From here, his opponent cannot continue to control his legs and will give up space for Gustavo to recover guard. Once he has recovered guard, Gustavo likes to immediately throw some attacks, like an omoplata, collar drag or anything available to keep his opponent defending.

Inside the University 437 - Avoiding Pressure

Inside the University 437 - Avoiding Pressure

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Focusing on a common mistake he sees his students making, Gustavo shows how some are crunching their bodies up and actually creating more pressure on themselves. Instead, they should be basing on their elbow and extending their body away from their opponent. Then he has the leverage to straighten his arm and bring his hips high in the air and turn to recover his guard.

Inside the University 436 - Finding Space Under the Head

Inside the University 436 - Finding Space Under the Head

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Answering a student's question about what to do when your opponent buries his head in your chest and doesn't give the space to make a collar grip, Gustavo just pushes the shoulder to defend the pass, and eventually his opponent will move and open the space. It is important, however, that he doesn't push his opponent's head. This will only make passing the guard easier for him.

Inside the University 435 - Defending the Leg Squeeze Pass

Inside the University 435 - Defending the Leg Squeeze Pass

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Professor Gustavo's opponent has both of his legs squeezed and is trying to pass his guard, so first Gustavo bases up on his elbow and reaches his other hand in for a cross collar grip and extends his arm. Pushing the edge of his foot off the floor, Gustavo raises his hips off the mat and turns facing down with his butt high in the air. As soon as he feels his opponent readjust his position, he turns back and replaces his guard.

Inside the University 434 - Extending Your Body Away from Your Opponent

Inside the University 434 - Extending Your Body Away from Your Opponent

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Correcting the most common mistake of his students, Saulo shows how he extends his body away from his opponent after he has connected his elbow and knee. Once his body is straight, then he can escape the hips and bring his inside leg back in to recover his guard. As always, he emphasize the need to drill over and over, repetition is the only way to learn.

Inside the University 433 - Defending from Your Side

Inside the University 433 - Defending from Your Side

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Answering some questions, Saulo stresses the importance of staying on your side after you bridge, and not letting your opponent flatten you out. Also, once your elbow and knee are connected, you must push off to extend your body, and then you will have the space to recover your guard.

Inside the University 432 - Creating Space to Replace Guard

Inside the University 432 - Creating Space to Replace Guard

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Breaking down a common mistake, Saulo stresses the importance of pushing yourself away from your opponent after bridging. Many students will bridge and immediately try to replace the guard, but they do not have the space to succeed. So it is vital to escape your hips and create the space to bring your legs in and recover guard.

Inside the University 431 - Arm Positioning while Defending Side Control

Inside the University 431 - Arm Positioning while Defending Side Control

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When in bottom side control, Saulo advises against bringing your inside arm down to your opponent's hip, as this can expose your neck for attack. Second, his outside arm cups near the top of the head, where he has more control than if he cupped the neck. After he bridges, he uses his arms to push himself away from his opponent, giving him the space he needs to set up his block.

Inside the University 430 - Blocking Side Control

Inside the University 430 - Blocking Side Control

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After your guard has been passed and your opponent establishes side control, it's very important to stay calm and not give up the fight. Next, do not get your hands trapped against yourself or try to push his hips. Instead, Saulo traps his opponent's head by closing his biceps on it. He keeps his other arm attached to his body and his hand loose and free to move around. Now he bridges and while on his shoulder, he connects his inside elbow and knee together to protect his side. Now he is in a good position to keep blocking the side control, and has set himself up to escape when he is ready.

Ribeiro Self Defense 6 - Avoiding Common Mistakes

Ribeiro Self Defense 6 - Avoiding Common Mistakes

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In a multiple attacker scenario, Saulo points out two very common mistakes his student makes. Rather than keeping his posture and turning out to the side, the student bent over and backed into his attacker. Both of these mistakes open him up to more danger, so one must be careful to avoid these.

Ribeiro Self Defense 5 - Reacting to Contact

Ribeiro Self Defense 5 - Reacting to Contact

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When practicing self defense, an important note is to work with different partners using different levels of intensity, starting with a more relaxed pace. This way you can focus on the technique rather than the strength, and learn how to react to different levels of strength.